Home IoT News Who is Responsible for the Security Breach of Connected Technology – Manufacturer or the End-User?
Who is Responsible for the Security Breach of Connected Technology – Manufacturer or the End-User?

Who is Responsible for the Security Breach of Connected Technology – Manufacturer or the End-User?

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A recent survey revealed that nine out of ten consumers think integrating strong security in connected devices are essential, while more than 75% people are aware that their smartphones can be easily hacked.

The study was conducted by Irdeto which surveyed more than 7,800 consumers across six different nations: India, China, Germany, Great Britain, Brazil and the United States. The study also conveyed that older generations were more concerned about the security of connected devices compared to the millennials.

When the question was raised against the security breach, and the responsible party i.e. consumer or manufacturer, 53% consumer mentioned the burden of responsibilities relies on both manufacturer and end-user, 15% customers believe that they are responsible, while 20% placed the blame on the producers. In China, more than 35% consumers believe that manufacturers should take the responsibility, followed by Brazil 25% and the UK 19%.

In contrast, Germans were overly concerned about the security of their connected devices whereas Brazilians were serious about their devices getting hacked.

However, it is the responsibility of manufacturers to integrate high-security measures. The foundation should be sturdy to prevent any external casualties. On the side, consumers should be aware of the cyber threats and keep their devices protected from cyber-attacks.

According to Mark Hearn, director of IoT security at Irdeto, “Today’s connected world needs consumers to be vigilant about security threats. On the device manufacturer side, there must be a better “defence-in-depth” approach to cybersecurity that integrates multiple layers of security into a system. This approach, combined with ongoing security updates to protect against the latest threats, is critical to mitigating attacks targeting IoT technologies.”

Though the connected technology has quickly reached a new paramount, security protocols are still being compromised. Manufacturers are concerned about selling more products, while consumers are busy rejoicing the new wave of technology. If this continues, very soon, connected technology might pose a greater threat than we can even imagine.